Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Christopher G. Singer, Corporal, United States Marine Corps




I.  Name:  Christopher G. Singer
II.  Rank:  Corporal
III.  Country Served:  United States
IV.  Service:  United States Marine Corps
V.  Conflict:  War in Afghanistan (Global War on Terrorism) (Operation Enduring Freedom)
VI.  Related News Items:



From: DoD News <dodnews@subscriptions.dod.mil>
Date: 01/24/2012
Subject: DOD Identifies Marine Casualty
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01/24/2012 12:46 PM CST


IMMEDIATE RELEASENo. 051-12
January 24, 2012

DOD Identifies Marine Casualty

            The Department of Defense announced today the death of a Marine who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
            Cpl. Christopher G. Singer, 23, of Temecula, Calif., died Jan. 21 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 3rd Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms, Calif.
            For additional information news media representatives may contact the 1st Marine Division public affairs office at 760-725-8766.

Bryan Bell, Senior Airman, United States Air Force





I.  Name:  Bryan Bell
II.  Rank:  Senior Airman
III.  Country Served:  United States
IV.  Service:  United States Air Force
V.  Conflict:  War in Afghanistan (Global War on Terrorism)
VI.  Related News Items:


Barksdale AFB mourns fallen EOD hero

Posted 1/25/2012   Updated 1/25/2012  Email story   Print story

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A memorial display for Senior Airman Bryan Bell, a 2nd Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, sits on display at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Jan. 20, 2012. Bell was killed in action Jan. 5 by an improvised explosive device while performing his duties for Delta Company, 466th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit, in Shir Ghazi, Helmand province, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Micaiah Anthony)



Airmen, family and friends gather to honor and remember Senior Airman Bryan Bell, a 2nd Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, during his memorial service at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Jan. 20, 2012. Bell was killed in action Jan. 5 by an improvised explosive device while performing his duties for Delta Company, 466th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit, in Shir Ghazi, Helmand province, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Micaiah Anthony)


A guest signs in for the memorial service for Senior Airman Bryan Bell, a 2nd Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Jan. 20, 2012. Airmen, family and friends gathered to honor and remember the fallen Airman. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Micaiah Anthony)



by Senior Airman La'Shanette V. Garrett
2nd Bomb Wing Public Affairs


1/25/2012 - BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La. (AFNS) -- Airmen and families here gathered to mourn the loss of a 2nd Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance technician Jan. 20.

Senior Airman Bryan Bell, 23, was killed in action Jan. 5 by an improvised explosive device while performing his duties for Delta Company, 466th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit, in Shir Ghazi, Helmand province, Afghanistan.

During the memorial ceremony, Bell, a native of Erie, Pa., was described as a fun-loving, humorous, kind-hearted and courageous Airman who brightened up any room he walked in.

"Bryan was extremely proud of his job -- so much that he had the EOD badge tattooed on his arm," said 1st Lt. Chad Houge, the 2nd CES EOD flight commander. "He earned that badge. It wasn't given to him. He took his profession seriously and sought to be the best. Bryan was brave, and he put himself in harm's way for the safety of others. He will be missed, but never forgotten."

In a letter from Afghanistan, Senior Master Sgt. Christopher Schott, the 466th EOD flight chief, conveyed his condolences for Bell and two other EOD teammates who were also killed during the incident: Tech. Sgt. Matthew Schwartz, from F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., and Airman 1st Class Mathew Seidler, from Peterson AFB, Colo.

"As you gather there at Barksdale to remember and honor my fallen comrade, I stand in remembrance with my family, 13,000 kilometers away, wishing nothing more than to be there," Schott wrote. "The loss of one of my own is devastating. I will never forget that fateful date and time. The loss of three of my brothers-in-arms in a single catastrophic incident is an unprecedented and inconceivable tragedy. Never, in my short 23-year career, have I imagined or experienced the hollowness and pain in my heart (that) I feel now. His loss rips through the core of my heart and soul as if he was my own flesh and blood."

The 2nd Bomb Wing commander also lamented on Barksdale's loss of an incredible Airman and American patriot.

"Our hearts and prayers go out to the family and friends of Senior Airman Bryan Bell," said Col. Tim Fay, the 2nd BW commander. "Bryan made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation. He is a true hero who will be sorely missed and always remembered."

Bell was laid to rest Jan. 16 in Wintergreen George Cemetery, Erie County, Pa., with full military honors, which included a 21-gun salute and a B-52H Stratofortress flyover. He deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan to support operations New Dawn and Enduring Freedom and was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal with valor, Purple Heart, Air Force Commendation Medal and Air Force Combat Action Medal.

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Matthew R. Seidler, Airman 1st Class, United States Air Force




21st CES Airman killed in Afghanistan

I.  Name:  Matthew R. Seidler
II.  Rank:  Airman First Class
III.  Country Served:  United States
IV.  Service:  United States Air Force
V.  Conflict:  War in Afghanistan (Global War on Terrorism)
VII.  Related News Items




Airmen gather to celebrate life of fallen EOD tech



  Hundreds gathered Jan. 20 to celebrate the life of Airman 1st Class Matthew R. Seidler, 21st Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance technician. Seidler was killed in Afghanistan from injuries suffered from an improvised explosive device on Jan. 5, just two days after his 24th birthday. He was the first Airman from the 21st Space Wing killed in action since the wing's inception in 1992. (U.S. Air Force photo/Rob Bussard)


Posted 1/24/2012   Updated 1/24/2012  Email story   Print story

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by Lea Johnson
21st Space Wing Public Affairs staff writer


1/24/2012 - PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Hundreds of military and civilians from across the region gathered on Jan. 20 to celebrate the life of Airman 1st Class Matthew R. Seidler, 21st Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance technician.

Seidler, from Westminster, Md., entered the Air Force in November 2009 and arrived at Peterson in January 2011. He was killed in Afghanistan from injuries suffered from an improvised explosive device on Jan. 5, just two days after his 24th birthday. He was the first Airman from the 21st Space Wing killed in action since the wing's inception in 1992.

His parents, Marc and Lauren Seidler, were among the distinguished visitors in attendance.

To many at the memorial service, Seidler was a brother, not by blood but by craft. Lt. Col. Mark Donnithorne, 21st CES commander said, "Matt proudly wore the badge of explosive ordnance disposal. It's one of the very few insignia that is common across all military services and it carries over to bomb squads across the nation. For everyone who wears that badge, it is a small symbol of the enormous devotion to their mission and to their brothers and sisters that put their lives on the line, side by side with them every day."

Airman 1st Class Terry Smith, EOD technician, said, "We would talk to each other about how proud we were to be part of such a close-knit, small community. The look in his eyes, you could tell it was a big deal for him."

Every day, Seidler was determined to be the best EOD technician that he could be. "When Matt arrived here at Peterson, he sought out every opportunity to train himself, to develop his EOD abilities, and excel at every task. He challenged himself and his fellow Airmen, and he put his all into everything he did," said Master Sgt. Paul Horton, EOD flight chief.

Described as a nearly perfect Airman, Seidler pushed himself daily and he pushed others around him to do their best. Smith said that even during physical training, he would run alongside others, encouraging them to keep going, to not give up, to not stop. "What he did and what he gave is more than I think I'll ever be able to give, but I still hope that sometime in my life I can look back and say that I did all I could to do right by him and say that I never quit, that I didn't stop, that I kept on going," Smith said. "That's the softer side of Matt that not everyone saw, but it's something I will always remember."

At the funeral in Baltimore, Md., on Jan. 17, Seidler was presented the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, the Air Force Commendation Medal and the Air Force Combat Action Medal posthumously.

Those closest to Seidler offered their thanks and condolences to his family. "To his parents, I just want to say you raised a fine young man, who blossomed into a great tech and an even better friend," Smith said.

Following the last roll call and taps, Seidler's family, both by blood and trade, paid their respects at the display of his boots, gun, and dog tags on stage.


And this, from USAF:



News > Peterson AFB members honor fallen EOD Airman
 
Photos 
21st CES Airman killed in Afghanistan
Airman 1st Class Matthew R. Seidler, 21st Civil Engineer Squadron, Peterson Air Force Base, died Jan. 5 from injuries suffered from an improvised explosive device attack in southern Afghanistan. 
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 Service members pay last respects to fallen Airmen - 1/26/2012
 Service members pay last respects to fallen Airmen - 1/26/2012
Peterson AFB members honor fallen EOD Airman

Posted 1/10/2012  Email story   Print story

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by Lea Johnson
21st Space Wing Public Affairs Office


1/10/2012 - PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- Members of the 21st Space Wing here suffered a tragic loss recently when it learned that Airman 1st Class Matthew R. Seidler was killed Jan. 5 in Afghanistan by an improvised explosive device.

Seidler was an explosive ordnance technician assigned to the 21st Civil Engineer Squadron here.

"Our deepest sympathies go out to his family in this time of grief," said Col. Chris Crawford, the 21st Space Wing commander. "He made the ultimate sacrifice for his country, and we will never forget him, nor the others who have met the same fate fighting for freedom both here and abroad."

Two other EOD Airmen were also killed in the attack. They are Senior Airman Bryan R. Bell, 23, of Erie, Pa., who was assigned to the 2nd Civil Engineer Squadron at Barksdale Air Force Base, La.; and Tech. Sgt. Matthew S. Schwartz, 34, of Traverse City, Mich., who was assigned to the 90th Civil Engineer Squadron at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo.

Seidler, 24, was from Westminster, Md. He entered the Air Force in November 2009 and arrived here in January 2011. He was the first Airman from the 21st Space Wing killed in action since the wing's inception in 1992.

"He was almost the perfect Airman," said Tech. Sgt. Jason Warden, an EOD craftsman assigned to the 21st CES. "He was really polite, and he was really big on customs and courtesies."

Seidler could often be found in the shop after work studying the equipment or for classes.

"You could tell that he was completely devoted to what we do, and he immersed himself completely in it. He turned into an incredible EOD Airman and enjoyed what we do," said Staff Sgt. Mathew Kimberling, an EOD craftsman assigned to the 21st CES.

The EOD shop is a close family, Kimberling said, and Seidler would often organize group hikes and activities. "He really enjoyed being here in Colorado, especially the outdoor life," Kimberling said.

Seidler was driven, committed and would take on any challenge because he wanted to be the best at everything he did. "He loved doing the incline," Warden said. "Last Friday, we all went as a shop to (hike) the incline in his name."

The EOD community is very small, with less than 1,000 members Air Force-wide, Kimberling said. "When the news spreads, it hurts everyone whether you knew them directly or whether it's just the fact that he was an EOD brother. Everyone feels it."

Lt. Col. Mark Donnithorne, the 21st CES commander, said, "EOD Airmen have been vital to Operation Enduring Freedom, and unfortunately, the pride we'll feel when we see Matt's name on the EOD Memorial Wall at Eglin (Air Force Base) will not extinguish the sorrow we feel from his loss. We will never forget Matt's sacrifice and dedication to his critical, yet dangerous, mission."

Seidler's funeral will be held Jan. 17 in Virginia where he will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery.

A memorial service will be held here at a later date.

Scott D. Sather, Staff Sergeant, United States Air Force




I.  Name:  Scott D. Sather
II.  Rank:  Staff Sergeant
III.  Country Served:  United States
IV.  Service:  United States Air Force
V.  Conflict:  Second Persian Gulf War (Operation Iraqi Freedom)
VI.  Related News Items

Sather Memorial finds rest at JB San Antonio


Staff Sgt. Dale Young, a 342nd Training Squadron combat controller, bows his head in reflection during a memorial unveiling ceremony for Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather on Jan. 20, 2012, at Medina Annex at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. Sather was the Air Force’s first combat casualty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Colville McFee)


Melanie Sather, the widow of Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather, and a family member pay their respect at the unveiling of a memorial honoring the sergeant Jan. 20, 2012, at Medina Annex at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. The 12,000-pound memorial was sea-lifted from Iraq to Lackland AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Marleah Miller)


Pararescuemen, combat controllers and Pararescue Indoctrination Course trainees perform “memorial push-ups” during a memorial unveiling ceremony Jan. 20, 2012, at Medina Annex at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. Originally created and displayed by Air Force civil engineers in Iraq, the memorial honors Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather, who was the Air Force’s first combat casualty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Marleah Miller)


Col. Marc Stratton, the Inter-American Air Forces Academy commandant, speaks during a memorial unveiling ceremony Jan. 20, 2012, at Medina Annex at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. The ceremony was held in honor of the leadership and bravery of Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather, a combat controller and the Air Force’s first combat casualty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Marleah Miller)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AFNS) -- A memorial honoring the U.S. Air Force's first combat casualty during Operation Iraqi Freedom was unveiled Jan. 20 at Medina Annex, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. 

Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather, a combat controller, was killed in Iraq on April 8, 2003. 

Pararescuemen, combat controllers and Pararescue Indoctrination Course trainees attended the memorial unveiling ceremony honoring Sather. 

His memorial was created and displayed by civil engineers in Iraq to honor his leadership and bravery. The memorial was sea-lifted from Sather Air Base, Iraq, to Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, in March 2011. 

Sather, who died at 29 years old, was originally from Michigan. He was last assigned to the 24th Special Tactics Squadron at Pope Air Force Base, N.C.

(Courtesy of Air Force Special Operations Command Public Affairs.)